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United States Light Pollution

Tracy

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This just gives you an idea of how challenging it is, especially out on the east coast and a small segment of the west coast (California, we're talking about you) to find dark skies. There is a lot of light pollution in areas that you would think would be more "green" in their behavior.

global_northam_Vb.jpg
 

Tracy

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It's pitiful when you live in a town of around 17,000 and the nearest "big" city is about a 45 minute drive away (105,000) and when you check for the area you live in you find this

ouch.jpg


No wonder my guide scope is having issues getting focused for me. Tonight it was bright enough to read outside... so just going to wait until the weather settles and the moon is not so bright and go down into the country to some friends land. It's in a Class 3 area so it should be easier to confirm in PHD2 that it's picking up stronger than what it was night before last.
The 2018 VIIRS gives that area a 0.46 that I'm going to go to.
 

Tracy

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Here is the mapping for the world's light pollution

F2.large.jpg
 

Tracy

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In addition to our local abnormally high light pollution, we have a thin haze of smoke in the upper atmosphere from the California wildfires.
Apparently it's already made it's way to the East Coast also, which presents viewing problems for most everyone now.

The smoke is being carried far & wide by the jet stream and there is a band of carbon monoxide that is also coming from the fire that goes to the east coast and splits southward towards Texas.

This is NASA's image of the smoke plume
unitedstates.a2017247.2054.1500m.jpg
 

OhNo

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Have they converted the street lamps to LED there already? My understanding is that People who invested in LP filters are finding their expensive filters won't/don't work for the wavelength that LEDs emit.

I am however really impressed with all photons! Amazing little things!!!
 

Tracy

Dark Sky Lover
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Messages
377
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William Optics 103mm
Celestron NexStar 8SE


Have they converted the street lamps to LED there already? My understanding is that People who invested in LP filters are finding their expensive filters won't/don't work for the wavelength that LEDs emit.
Not in my neck of the woods.. they still use (the government and most businesses) fluorescent and sodium based industrial lighting. There are a FEW places on our major loop that they have put up LED lights, but that is probably less than 5% of the installs in town. We do have some IDS recognized sites here in Texas.. mainly a few State Parks. I'm currently adding several IDS sites into the DB for KStars.... and plan on sending it to them - as well as making it available here for download.

Some of our larger surrounding cities are pushing LED, not so much because it's better... simply because it is cheaper. Most of the houses around me use LED now for exterior lighting. I had been contemplating an Optolong L-Pro... but at roughly $200 for the 2" (for the William Optics) and $150 for the 1.25" (add about $100 to that if you want the dual bandpass) I decided that I could hold off and put in the "kitty" towards one of the CEM40's or maybe an AM5.
 

OhNo

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There's money in AP, WE put it there!😉😂🤣
 
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